Leadership

Photos of The LatinTRENDS Digital Pivot Announcement at Facebook Headquarters

Photos of The LatinTRENDS Digital Pivot Announcement at Facebook Headquarters

 

LatinTRENDS was hosted by Facebook in NYC on Tuesday May 23. The event bought together men and women from all fields of endeavor in a progressive-upbeat environment.

The company announced its new direction into a digital first media company and that it is no longer in the print/magazine business. During the brief speech, Juan Guillen, founder introduced two new partners to the brand that will help build out the digital arm, in addition to improve sales, operations and marketing.

The event was sponsored by The Ministry of Tourism of the Dominican Republic and Moet Hennessy, Hors d’oeuvres served by Salsa Catering.

Photos by Jhon Caballero

 

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City College & University of Texas Partnering to Produce Next Generation of Hispanic Professors

The City College of New York is partnering with the University of Texas at El Paso to educate the next generation of Hispanic professors in environmental sciences and engineering. Entitled “Collaborative Research: The Hispanic AGEP Alliance for the Environmental Science and Engineering Professoriate,” the five-year project is funded by a $3.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation. It begins July 1, 2017.

Harlem-based City College, which is designated a Hispanic Serving Institution of Higher Education by the U.S. Department of Education, will receive $2.315 million of the funding and UTEP $1.3 million.

Under the administration of CCNY’s NOAA CREST, the two institutions will collaborate to develop, implement and study a model for training and transitioning Hispanic environmental sciences and engineering (ESE) doctoral students to STEM instructional faculty positions at community colleges and other institutions. Candidates must have completed all coursework and be dissertating, as they transition.

Participants will primarily include Hispanic doctoral students of Caribbean or   Mexican origin, who are advanced level doctoral candidates majoring in ESE fields. These include civil, electrical, mechanical or biomedical engineering; earth and atmospheric sciences; ecology and evolutionary biology, among other disciplines.

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The project will be led by CCNY faculty Jorge E. Gonzalez, Fred Moshary, Joseph Barba, Kyle McDonald and Ellen E. Smiley.  UTEP experts include: Miguel Velez-Reyes, Craig Tweedie, and Ivonne Santiago.

The CCNY-UTEP partnership is in response to the NSF’s Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program solicitation.  AGEP seeks to advance knowledge about models to improve pathways to the professoriate and success of historically underrepresented minority (URM) graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields.

There are three community college partners in the Hispanic AGEP Alliance: LaGuardia Community College, Queensborough Community College and El Paso Community College in El Paso, TX.

The NSF grant to CCNY and UTEP brings up to $23 million in awards to City College since last fall for training underrepresented minority scientists and engineers. Last September CCNY won a $15.5 million NOAA grant to produce mostly minority STEM scientists.

In addition, $5.2 million was received from the U.S. Department of Education in October to promote STEM education, particularly among underrepresented groups.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View

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Carolina Huaranca, Tech-Entrepreneur, Venture Capitalist & Principal of Kapor Capital

Latinos in tech have a long way to go (grow) less than 1 percent of venture-backed start-ups has a Latino founder, according to CB Insights. The good news is Carolina Huaranca is ready to change the game. The Peruvian-American is one of Silicon Valley’s few Latina venture capitalists. As a Principal at Kapor Capital, she specializes in identifying and investing in early-stage tech companies that are closing gaps of access, opportunity, or outcome for low-income communities in the U.S. Carolina has also been on the other side of the table as a tech founder prior to venture. She was the CEO and co-founder of Spriggle, a marketplace that helped parents identify education products for children ages 3-9. In

Carolina Huaranca Mendoza joined Kapor Capital in 2016 and focuses on identifying early stage investments, evaluating those investments, and partnering with entrepreneurs to grow their companies. She is particularly interested in Future Work, People Operations Technology, and Education. Prior to becoming Principal, she was an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the Kapor Center for Social Impact (KCSI) working on a tech platform for teacher professional development.

Carolina began her career as a Mergers & Acquisitions investment banker at Citi but left to pursue opportunities in the technology and education sectors. She began her technology career in 2003 as a Sales & Marketing Manager at SchoolNet, which sold to Pearson for $230MM. In 2012, she founded Spriggle, a marketplace helping parents identify science and math inspired products for children ages 3-9.

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Carolina is a graduate of Cornell University and was awarded the Konologie Fellowship at The Wharton School. As a woman and first-generation Peruvian-American from Long Island, Carolina is passionate about ensuring that people from all backgrounds know how to access capital. Based on her experience serving as the founding National Director of Girls Who Code Clubs, where she launched 186 Clubs serving approximately 2,000 girls, she is extremely passionate about working to close the gender gap in technology. Outside of work, Carolina mentors women entrepreneurs and low-income teens interested in pursuing careers in tech.

 

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The Many Faces of Fidel Castro

Photo by Kenya News

Photo by Kenya News

Saint, idealist, rebel, leader, dictator. Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz, or simply known as Fidel Castro, was a controversial man of many faces not just to Cubans, or Cuban-Americans, but to people around the world.

During his teens, his mentors and classmates found him to be a stubborn and deeply religious man, almost saintly. As a boy, he was sent to study at Colegio de Dolores in Santiago de Cuba with Jesuits, and when a priest fell down a stream during a hike it was Castro that pulled him to safety. Together, the two prayed fervently after surviving the ordeal.

In 1945, he joined the University of Havana‘s law school. It was there that Castro read Marxist literature, studied everything there was on Cuban politics and befriended Communist students. At this point in his life, he was simply a strong-willed, idealistic and open-minded man that wanted to fight against the oppression of the poor, but radical ideologies began to seep into his school of thought.

Castro’s father, Angel Castro, influenced him to fight for those in need. Angel, an impoverished Spaniard came to Cuba with nothing but dreams for a better life. In time, Angel Castro owned a plantation and became a landowner.

Castro became a lawyer for the poor once he obtained his degree. Since many of his clients had no money, they paid for his services with food.

It was the early 1950s when he started to struggle with the merits of democracy versus communism. Wanting to do more for those that were suffering, Castro ran for Congress only for the elections not to be upheld because of former dictator Fulgencio Batista returning to the country, taking over the government and destroying what was left of the democratic process in Cuba.

As a rebel with a cause, Castro made an appeal through the court system to take a stance against Colonel Batista’s violation of the Cuban Constitution. When that was unsuccessful, in 1953 Castro and almost 200 hundred followers attacked the military Moncada Barracks. His men were outnumbered 10 to 1 when they lost the element of surprise.

Unfortunately, this only led to Castro and what was left of his followers becoming political prisoners. This experience would go on to shape his future and that of Cuba’s for 50 years.

Believing that Castro and his men lost hope and would no longer be a threat, Batista released the surviving members of the Moncada Barracks attack after one year in 1954 so as not to come off as a dictator. This would prove to be a critical error.

Castro and his men were emboldened after their release. First, Castro retreated to Mexico, but then he came back to Cuba on an old yacht with the Argentine radical Che Guevara. With his power of speech and a group of 80, Castro initiated several guerrilla campaigns against Colonel Batista. By New Year’s Day of 1959, Batista fled Cuba.

Within a few months, Fidel Castro became the very thing he fought against, a Cuban dictator. Castro became paranoid after his coup and proceeded over the execution of 500 of Batista’s former officials.

In 1960, Cuba took over land that was owned by American and British landowners angering both superpowers in the process. This led to the Cuban embargo, in which the United States cut ties with the country. Castro turned to the Soviet Union for financial support.

As a dictator, he helped to increase sugar harvests in the country, attempted to bring about racial equality, and made social progress through medical advancements. However, the downside to his dictatorship was extreme poverty, political imprisonment and the loss of rights for citizens of Cuba, especially the middle class.

No matter what you consider Fidel Castro to be, idealist, rebel, or dictator, he was revolutionary and changed the course of history not only for Cuba but for all of Latin America, for good and bad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Policy & America’s Perception of Higher Education and Economic Mobility

Lehman President José Luis Cruz took part in an important educational panel in Washington D.C. last Thursday, discussing and debating how to translate America’s perception of higher education and economic mobility into policy.

The panel entitled “Diving into the Data: Translating America’s Perceptions Into Policy,” was organized by New America, a non-partisan think tank that recently surveyed 1,600 Americans about their opinions on the country’s higher education system. A link to the video is available here.

On the panel, Cruz conveyed his hopes and concerns facing the country’s public higher education system. He talked about Lehman’s high economic mobility rate (fourth in the nation according to a study published in The New York Times), the College’s goal to double its credentials to 90,000 by 2030, and how cuts in government funding are especially problematic for public colleges and universities.

“It is important for [policymakers] to realize that two-year and four-year public sector institutions are really the ones that are disproportionately serving students in the U.S., particularly low-income students and students of color,” said President Cruz. “For our nation to be secure and prosperous moving forward, they have to start looking at these two- and four-year institutions and providing us the resources we need.”

President Cruz’s fellow panelists were Cheryl Oldham, vice president of education policy, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Scott Ralls, president, Northern Virginia Community College; and Deborah Santiago, chief operating officer and vice president for policy, Excelencia in Education. The moderator was Rob Nabors, director of U.S. policy, advocacy, and communications, at The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The panel was part of New America’s public release of a report entitled “Varying Degrees: How America Perceives Higher Education.” The report includes a few institutional profiles of innovative and effective higher education programs, among which Lehman’s Adult Degree Program (ADP) is highlighted. A link to the ADP profile is available

 

 

Formerly Homeless Teen Helps Family stabilize itself & Now Will Attend Harvard

A Manual Arts High School senior whose family of six was homeless for three months after his father lost his job will be attending Harvard University this fall, thanks to a USC program.

Jorge Campos, 17, currently lives with his family in Palmdale. His days are long, as he makes the approximately 140-mile round trip to his high school in South Los Angeles and back.

“Sometimes I’m getting home at midnight, and I have wake up the next morning at 5 or 4:30 ” he said.

But for Campos, the distance is nothing compared to what he’s been through.

Campos was only13 years old and set to begin high school when his father, an auto mechanic lost his job. The family was homeless for three months, living in a van, hotels and staying with relatives.

“Right now, I look back and instead of breaking down and crying , because they were very traumatic experiences, I just look at it  what I lived through and look forward,” said Campos

As difficult as his circumstances were, he didn’t let that be an excuse from succeeding academically.

That year, Campos — a USC TRIO Upward Bound Scholar — enrolled in college level courses at Los Angeles Community College. He needs to complete just three classes to earn his associates degree in Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

Homelessness was a motivating factor in shaping his education, as it prompted Campos to learn about finances, according to a news release from USC.

He even learned how his family could transition from a “high loan risk” to homeowners, which helped them purchase their home in Palmdale two years ago.

“I took on the budget. I took on the finances. All the bills that are paid at home run through me,” Campos told said

The son of Mexican parents, Campos grew up in South L.A. a few blocks away from the University of Southern California campus. He was invited to join the USC TRIO Upward Bound Math and Science program at his high school during his freshman year.

The program is geared toward helping high school students who are first-generation college bound, low-income students fulfill their potential and go to university. It provides students like Campos educational tools and resources at USC.

About 2,500 students are currently in the program, which is in its 40th year, the release stated.

Campos credits this program with helping achieve his success

9 Power Questions that Will Help You Build Better Business Relationships

 

Just a few years ago, globalization was in full swing, and the world seemed to be bursting with an infinite supply of business. All this bounty lulled us into taking our customers for granted, maintains Andrew Sobel—until the economy tanked and shattered the illusion of endless prosperity. Suddenly, the old-fashioned “trusted relationship” started to look good again.

“In this post-Madoff era of unpredictability and suspicion, people are looking for deeper, more intimate, and more engaged relationships—the kind that reduce risk,” says Sobel, author (along with coauthor, Jerold Panas) of Power Questions: Build Relationships, Win New Business, and Influence Others (Wiley, February 2012, ISBN: 978-11181196-3-1, $22.95) and three other books on long-term business relationships.

“This is true of customers but also vendors, employees, and other business partners,” he adds. “The days of getting in, making money, and moving on to the next guy are over. When times are tough and the future is uncertain, people want to put down roots and partner with people they truly like and trust.”

Bottom line: In today’s markets, the most valuable commodity is the ability to connect with others and rapidly build trust. And that begins by asking the right questions.

“Asking questions and letting people come up with their own answers is far more effective than spouting facts or trying to talk someone into something,” Sobel explains. “Telling creates resistance. Asking creates relationships.”

In his book Sobel explores dozens of questions that light fires under people, challenge their assumptions, help them see problems in productive new ways, and inspire them to bare their souls (which, of course, strengthens the bonds in the relationship).

Here are nine ways questions can transform professional and personal relationships:

  1. • Questions turn one-dimensional, arms-length business relationships into personal relationships that endure for years. “When a relationship is all business and there is no real personal connection, it lacks heart and soul,” says Sobel. “And therefore you are a commodity—a kind of fungible expert-for-hire. A client—or your boss—can trade you out for a new model with no remorse or emotion. But when you’ve connected personally, the situation is transformed because clients stick with people they like. Bosses hold on to team members they feel passionately about. Your expertise and competence get you in the door, but it’s the personal connection that then builds deep loyalty.”Sobel tells the story of a senior partner in a top consulting firm who had to meet with the CEO of a major client. Other consultants were nipping at their heels to get more business from this company. This powerful, confident CEO, who was in his 60s and near retirement, had seen hundreds of consulting reports. At the end of a routine briefing, the senior partner paused and asked the CEO, “Before we break up, can I ask you a question?” The CEO nodded. The partner said, “You’ve had an extraordinary career. You have accomplished so much, starting at the very first rung of the ladder, on the manufacturing floor. As you look ahead—is there something else you’d like to accomplish? Is there a dream you’ve yet to fulfill?”The CEO was nearly stunned. He thought for a moment and replied, “No one has ever asked me that question. No one.” And then he began talking about a deeply held dream he had for his retirement. That question was the turning point in building a long-term, deeply personal relationship with an influential business leader.
  2. • They make the conversation about the other person—not about them. Most of us don’t care what other people think—we want to know first if they care about us. The need to be heard is one of the most powerful motivating forces in human nature. That’s why one of Sobel’s power questions is, What do you think? Another is, Can you tell me more? “There’s an anecdote I love about a woman who has dinner, in the same month, with two great rival British statesmen of the 19th century, Gladstone and Disraeli,” says Sobel. “When asked to compare the two men she says, ‘After my dinner with Mr. Gladstone, I thought he was the cleverest man in the world.’ And then she adds, ‘After my dinner with Mr. Disraeli, I felt as though I were the cleverest woman in all of England!’ “When you make the conversation all about you, others may think you are clever,” he adds. “But you will not build their trust. You will not learn about them. You will squander the opportunity to build the foundations for a rich, long-term relationship.”
  3. • They cut through the “blah, blah, blah” and create more authentic conversations. No doubt you can relate to this scenario. A person says, “I want to bounce something off you.” Then, he proceeds to spend ten minutes telling you every detail of a very convoluted situation he is enmeshed in. You do yourself and the other person a favor by getting him to focus on the true kernel of his issue. Simply ask: What is your question? “This is a tough-love question,” admits Sobel. “People will resist it—often strenuously. But you must ask it. It forces them to take the first step toward clarifying what the issue is and what advice they really need from you. You’ll reduce the amount of posturing people do and will move faster toward an authentic conversation.”
  4. • They help people clarify their thinking and “get out of the cave.” The ancient Greek philosopher Socrates said that we perceive reality as if we are chained inside a dark cave. In that cave, we see only the blurred shadows of life outside the cave as they are projected on a dark wall at the back. Our understanding of reality is filtered and distorted. By asking a series of questions, Socrates would engage his students’ minds in the learning process. In this way he uncovered assumptions and slowly but surely got to the heart of the issue. The “Socratic Method” is still used at Harvard Business School—and it can enable you to help others see the true reality instead of shadowy representations of it. Instead of saying, “We need to improve our customer service!” Sobel suggests asking: “How would you assess our customer service levels today?” Or, “How is our service impacting our customer retention?” If someone at work says, “We need more innovation,” ask, “Can you describe what innovation means to you? How would we know if we had more of it?” Or if there is a call for more teamwork, ask, “What do you mean when you say ‘teamwork’?”
  5. • They help you zero in on what matters most to the other person. The next time you’re talking to someone and realize you’ve “lost” her—she’s fidgeting, she’s stopped asking questions, maybe she’s sneaking glances at the clock—ask this question: What is the most important thing we should be discussing today? You will instantly connect with what really matters to her—and the conversation that ensues will help her see you as relevant and valuable. “Even if your agenda doesn’t get met, hers will,” asserts Sobel. “And then she will want to enthusiastically reciprocate. In business it’s critical to be seen as advancing the other person’s agenda of essential priorities and goals. When time is spent together on issues that are truly important to both parties, the relationship deepens and grows.”
  6. • They help others tap into their essential passion for their work. One of the highest-impact power questions you can ask is, Why do you do what you do? It grabs people by the heart and motivates them. When they seriously consider and answer this question, the room will light up with passion. Dull meetings will transform into sessions that pop with energy and generate ideas that vault over bureaucratic hurdles and create real impact. “We do things for many reasons,” writes Sobel. “But when you put ‘should’ in front of those reasons, you can be certain all the pleasure and excitement will soon be drained away. No one gets excited about should. In contrast, when you unveil the true why of someone’s work and actions—when you get them to start sentences with ‘I love to’ or ‘I get excited when’—you will find passion, energy, and motivation.”
  7. • They inspire people to work at a higher level. The late Steve Jobs was notorious for pushing employees. He asked people constantly, Is this the best you can do? It’s a question that infused Apple’s corporate culture from the beginning. It’s one that helped revolutionize the desktop computing, music, and cellular phone industries. And it’s one that you can use too—sparingly and carefully—when you need someone to stretch their limits and do their very best work. “Often, we settle for mediocrity when we need to do our best,” reflects Sobel. “Mediocrity is the enemy of greatness. Asking, Is this the best you can do? helps others achieve things they did not believe possible.”
  8. • They can save you from making a fool of yourself. Before responding to a request or answering someone’s question to you, it’s often wise to get more information about what the other person really wants. When a potential employer says, “Tell me about yourself,” you can bore them to tears by rambling on and on about your life—or you could respond by asking, “What would you like to know about me?” When a prospect asks, “Can you tell me about your firm?” the same dynamic applies. Most people go on and on about their company, but the client is usually interested in one particular aspect of your business, not how many offices you have in Europe. Ever seen someone answer the wrong question? It’s painful to watch. Asking a clarifying question can save you huge embarrassment. “A potential client asked me for the names of three references to call,” Sobel tells us. “Instead of running around and drumming up the names, I pushed back, and asked, ‘What particular information are you seeking? Any references I give you are only going to rave about me!’ It turned out the prospect had no interest in actual references. And in fact, had she called my past clients under that pretense, it could have been potentially embarrassing to me for them to make such a big deal about a small speaking engagement. What she really wanted to understand was how other clients of mine had tackled the organizational resistance she was expecting. This question—and the subsequent conversation—turned a small lead for a keynote speech into a major, year-long project.”
  9. • They can salvage a disastrous conversation. Sobel’s coauthor, Jerry Panas, recalls the time he asked a man named Allan for a million-dollar donation to his alma mater’s College of Engineering. Though he knew better, the author failed to gain rapport and explore Allan’s true motivations before jumping in with the big request. When Allan rebuked him for his presumptuousness, Panas realized he had made a serious error. He apologized, left the room, and twenty seconds later knocked on the door and asked the power question, Do you mind if we start over? Start over they did, and Panas ultimately discovered that Allan might indeed be interested in making a gift—but to the University’s theater program, not its engineering program!

“Things like this happen all the time in business—and at home,” reflects Sobel. “Interactions get off on the wrong foot, and someone gets angry or offended or just shuts down. But people are forgiving. They want to have a great conversation with you. Asking, Do you mind if we start over? will disarm the other person and make him smile. That smile will ease the way to a new beginning.”

One of the greatest benefits of becoming a master questioner is that it takes a lot of pressure off us, notes Sobel. It’s a huge relief to know that you don’t have to be quick, clever, or witty—that you don’t have to have all the answers.

“All business interactions are human interactions,” he says. “And part of being human is acknowledging that you don’t know everything about everything—and that you certainly don’t know everything about the other person and her needs. Questions help you understand these things more deeply.

“The right questions unleash a cascade of innermost feelings and vibrant conversations,” he adds. “They help you bypass what’s irrelevant and get straight to what’s truly meaningful. They make people like you, trust you, and want to work with you—and once you’ve achieved that, the battle is already won.”

Four CUNY Faculty Win National Science Foundation Early Career Awards

Dr. Hysell Oviedo is one of four young and talented City University of New York assistant professors to receive the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award for early-career faculty of exceptional promise. The awards come with grants totaling almost $2.3 million to support their development as “outstanding researchers and educators.”

The NSF’s Early Career Development (CAREER) award  recognizes “early-career faculty who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization,” according to the foundation. “Activities pursued by early-career faculty should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research.”

CUNY’s Chancellor, James B. Milliken, said, “These awards offer a wonderful endorsement of our efforts to bring talented new faculty to CUNY on a regular basis. What is particularly important is that our students benefit from their research and skills. I congratulate these award winners and look forward to seeing the results of their exciting work.”

The CAREER award is the most prestigious honor the NSF bestows on early-career, tenure-track assistant professors, who are required to submit proposals for research projects in which they are the principal investigators. In the 2016 competition for this year’s awards, CUNY had 21 applicants.

The four CUNY scholars honored by the NSF CAREER program this year are:

  • Hysell Oviedo, assistant professor of biology at City College, who is expected to receive $725,642 in NSF funding. Her CAREER project, “Mechanisms of Lateralized Auditory Processing,” focuses on how the left and right sides of the brain differentially process sounds important for listening to the environment and communicating with others.
  • Sarang Gopalakrishnan, assistant professor of physics at the College of Staten Island, awarded $484,348 by the NSF. His CAREER project, “Quantum Many-Body Physics Beyond the Boltzmann Paradigm,” probes the behavior of large physical systems that are not reversible, meaning that the current state of complex systems becomes independent of the initial conditions. His research is novel and contrary to classical quantum physics theory.
  • Louis-Pierre Arguin, assistant professor of mathematics at Baruch College, granted an award of $446,046. His winning project, “Statistics of Extrema in Complex and Disordered Systems,” will provide a statistical analysis of the patterns of complex systems as driven by critical but rare events called extrema.
  • Jean Gaffney, assistant professor of chemistry at Baruch College, expected to receive $636,977 in funding. Her NSF project, “Discovery of Tunable Fluorescent Proteins from Marine Organisms: Integrating Education and Research in the Identification and Development of Novel Fluorescent Probes,” explores the chemistry of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms and their applications for basic and biomedical research as molecular markers.

The intent of the NSF program, which grants awardees at least $400,000 for the five-year duration of the award, “is to provide stable support at a sufficient level and duration to enable awardees to develop careers as outstanding researchers and educators who effectively integrate teaching, learning and discovery,” according to the foundation.

Trump Chooses Jovita Carranza as the 7th Latina US Treasurer

President Trump has named Jovita Carranza treasurer of the United States.

The White House said Carranza is the founder of JCR Group and previously served as deputy administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration. She previously worked at the United Parcel Service.

Jovita Carranza will be the 7th Latina to hold this position

According to its website, the treasurer of the United States “has direct oversight over the U.S. Mint, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and Fort Knox and is a key liaison with the Federal Reserve. In addition, the Treasurer serves as a senior adviser to the Secretary in the areas of community development and public engagement.”

Entrepreneurs Over 50 are the Fastest Growing in America

⇑50 is the New 30⇓

A growing number of workers age 50-plus are turning interests, hobbies or skills into a small business.  Whether you are interested in starting a small business right away or are intending to wait until after retirement, now is the time to explore the possibilities.

But why do people in that age range — many of whom may have already had lengthy careers working for established organizations — want to start businesses? When Gallup studied nearly 2,000 U.S. baby boomers, including entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs, we found that an overwhelming majority — 83% — say their main reason for launching a venture was a lifestyle choice or to increase their income.

The Kauffman Foundation says 26% of new entrepreneurs in 2015 were 55 to 64 compared with 15% in 1997.

Many baby boomers are looking for what the Small Business Administration describes as an “encore” career. These boomer entrepreneurs are primarily choosing to start businesses because it allows them to be independent (32%), pursue their interests and passions (27%) or increase their income (24%), rather than committing to the grueling task of starting and managing a high-intensity, high-growth venture. Very few (10%) are pursuing an idea for a new product or service that solves a problem or meets an unfulfilled need in the market — the type of business that would typically have immense growth potential.

Whether your target market is global or just your neighborhood, the SBA and its Resource Partners can help at every stage of turning your entrepreneurial dream into a thriving business.

Summer of Encore Mentoring- Small Business Administration
It’s official – June 1 begins the Summer of Encore Mentoring. Encore entrepreneurs over the age of 50 are one of the fastest growing groups of business owners.  If you are an individual age 50+, then entrepreneurship can offer an opportunity for you to use your knowledge, passion, life and professional experience toward creating a small business. You can learn more about becoming an encore entrepreneur at a local event near you by.

SBA Offers Free Online Courses, check here: http://bit.ly/1tBT2h8

 Starting a Business – Are You Ready?
Do you have what it takes to start your own company?

Take a quick biz quiz from AARP:  http://bit.ly/29rOzyr