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Photos of The LatinTRENDS Digital Pivot Announcement at Facebook Headquarters

Photos of The LatinTRENDS Digital Pivot Announcement at Facebook Headquarters

 

LatinTRENDS was hosted by Facebook in NYC on Tuesday May 23. The event bought together men and women from all fields of endeavor in a progressive-upbeat environment.

The company announced its new direction into a digital first media company and that it is no longer in the print/magazine business. During the brief speech, Juan Guillen, founder introduced two new partners to the brand that will help build out the digital arm, in addition to improve sales, operations and marketing.

The event was sponsored by The Ministry of Tourism of the Dominican Republic and Moet Hennessy, Hors d’oeuvres served by Salsa Catering.

Photos by Jhon Caballero

 

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City College & University of Texas Partnering to Produce Next Generation of Hispanic Professors

The City College of New York is partnering with the University of Texas at El Paso to educate the next generation of Hispanic professors in environmental sciences and engineering. Entitled “Collaborative Research: The Hispanic AGEP Alliance for the Environmental Science and Engineering Professoriate,” the five-year project is funded by a $3.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation. It begins July 1, 2017.

Harlem-based City College, which is designated a Hispanic Serving Institution of Higher Education by the U.S. Department of Education, will receive $2.315 million of the funding and UTEP $1.3 million.

Under the administration of CCNY’s NOAA CREST, the two institutions will collaborate to develop, implement and study a model for training and transitioning Hispanic environmental sciences and engineering (ESE) doctoral students to STEM instructional faculty positions at community colleges and other institutions. Candidates must have completed all coursework and be dissertating, as they transition.

Participants will primarily include Hispanic doctoral students of Caribbean or   Mexican origin, who are advanced level doctoral candidates majoring in ESE fields. These include civil, electrical, mechanical or biomedical engineering; earth and atmospheric sciences; ecology and evolutionary biology, among other disciplines.

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The project will be led by CCNY faculty Jorge E. Gonzalez, Fred Moshary, Joseph Barba, Kyle McDonald and Ellen E. Smiley.  UTEP experts include: Miguel Velez-Reyes, Craig Tweedie, and Ivonne Santiago.

The CCNY-UTEP partnership is in response to the NSF’s Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program solicitation.  AGEP seeks to advance knowledge about models to improve pathways to the professoriate and success of historically underrepresented minority (URM) graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields.

There are three community college partners in the Hispanic AGEP Alliance: LaGuardia Community College, Queensborough Community College and El Paso Community College in El Paso, TX.

The NSF grant to CCNY and UTEP brings up to $23 million in awards to City College since last fall for training underrepresented minority scientists and engineers. Last September CCNY won a $15.5 million NOAA grant to produce mostly minority STEM scientists.

In addition, $5.2 million was received from the U.S. Department of Education in October to promote STEM education, particularly among underrepresented groups.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View

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Carolina Huaranca, Tech-Entrepreneur, Venture Capitalist & Principal of Kapor Capital

Latinos in tech have a long way to go (grow) less than 1 percent of venture-backed start-ups has a Latino founder, according to CB Insights. The good news is Carolina Huaranca is ready to change the game. The Peruvian-American is one of Silicon Valley’s few Latina venture capitalists. As a Principal at Kapor Capital, she specializes in identifying and investing in early-stage tech companies that are closing gaps of access, opportunity, or outcome for low-income communities in the U.S. Carolina has also been on the other side of the table as a tech founder prior to venture. She was the CEO and co-founder of Spriggle, a marketplace that helped parents identify education products for children ages 3-9. In

Carolina Huaranca Mendoza joined Kapor Capital in 2016 and focuses on identifying early stage investments, evaluating those investments, and partnering with entrepreneurs to grow their companies. She is particularly interested in Future Work, People Operations Technology, and Education. Prior to becoming Principal, she was an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the Kapor Center for Social Impact (KCSI) working on a tech platform for teacher professional development.

Carolina began her career as a Mergers & Acquisitions investment banker at Citi but left to pursue opportunities in the technology and education sectors. She began her technology career in 2003 as a Sales & Marketing Manager at SchoolNet, which sold to Pearson for $230MM. In 2012, she founded Spriggle, a marketplace helping parents identify science and math inspired products for children ages 3-9.

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Carolina is a graduate of Cornell University and was awarded the Konologie Fellowship at The Wharton School. As a woman and first-generation Peruvian-American from Long Island, Carolina is passionate about ensuring that people from all backgrounds know how to access capital. Based on her experience serving as the founding National Director of Girls Who Code Clubs, where she launched 186 Clubs serving approximately 2,000 girls, she is extremely passionate about working to close the gender gap in technology. Outside of work, Carolina mentors women entrepreneurs and low-income teens interested in pursuing careers in tech.

 

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Singer Demi Lovato Embraces Her Latin Curves!

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Singer Demi Lovato says her Latino roots are one reason she learned to love her curves.
In a recent interview the singer spoke about the importance of “self-care,” plugging in her new skin care collection and how she now realizes how her Latin background has impacted the way she views her body.

After overcoming an eating disorder of her own as young on-screen teen Lovato explained how she keeps her past eating habits at suppressed and works on her self-esteem.

It’s very easy for my old eating habits to kick in, so I follow a pretty strict routine,” Lovato told Glam. “I don’t like to call it a diet, because for me it’s medicine. I have a nutritionist who sends me meals wherever I am on the road. This makes everything super simple.

Lovato also said that a big part of loving yourself is taking care of yourself, which was one of the reasons she recently launched the skincare line Devonne by Demi.

Lovato also admitted that she took her Mexican roots for granted as a child.

Growing up in America, I never really appreciated my culture,” Lovato said “I knew what being Hispanic was, but I thought that since I didn’t look Hispanic, I was white.

Over the years, however, her Latino background has changed the way she views her own body.

I tried to conform to what everyone thinks is beautiful,” Lovato continued. “But my genetics gave me a curvy figure, and I’ve come to understand that in the Latina culture, that is beautiful. I no longer look at my body and think, Oh my gosh, I have such a fat butt. Or, I hate my thighs. On some days I don’t love them. But, you know, that’s one of the things that makes me me.

1930s Massive Deportation of Mexican-Americans. Could History Repeat itself?

President Donald Trump’s call for mass deportation of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, and possibly their American-born children, bears similarities to a large-scale removal that many Mexican-American families faced 85 years ago.

During the Great Depression, counties and cities in the American Southwest and Midwest forced Mexican immigrants and their families to leave the U.S. over concerns they were taking jobs away from whites despite their legal right to stay.

The result: Around 500,000 to 1 million Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans were pushed out of the country during the 1930s repatriation, as the removal is sometimes called.

During that time, immigrants were rounded up and sent to Mexico, sometimes in public places and often without formal proceedings. Others, scared under the threat of violence, left voluntarily.

About 60 percent of those who left were American citizens, according to various studies on the 1930s repatriation. Later testimonies show families lost most of their possessions and some family members died trying to return. Neighborhoods in cities such as Houston, San Antonio and Los Angeles became empty.

A message to all Latinos from the LatinTRENDS Team:  Make absolutely sure to vote and register to vote. Let your voice be heard. Allow yourself that right, so that the ugly part of history does not repeat itself

 

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The impact of the experience on Latinos remains evident today, experts and advocates say.

“It set the tone for later deportations,” said Francisco Balderrama, a Chicano studies professor at California State University, Los Angeles.

Two weeks ago, Trump said that, if elected president, he would expand deportations and end “birthright citizenship” for children born to immigrants who are here illegally. Under his plan, American-born children of immigrants also would be deported with their parents, and Mexico would be asked to help build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“They’re illegal,” Trump said of U.S.-born children of people living in the country illegally. “You either have a country or not.”

Amid his comments on immigration, polls show negative impressions of Trump among Latinos. A Gallup poll released Aug. 24 found that Hispanics were more likely to give Trump unfavorable ratings than favorable ones by 51 percentage points.

Some immigrant advocates pointed to the removal of prominent Latino journalist Jorge Ramos from an Iowa press conference last week as a metaphor for the candidate’s desire to remove Latinos from the United States.

“Mr. Trump should heed the following warning: Our Latino and immigrant communities are not going to forget the way he has treated them,” the Washington, D.C.-based Fair Immigration Reform Movement said in a statement.

Ramos, an anchor for Univision, was escorted out by a Trump aide after Ramos, who had criticized Trump previously, tried to question Trump about his immigration plan. Trump interrupted Ramos, saying he hadn’t been called on, and ultimately told Ramos, “Go back to Univision.”

Ramos was saying, “You cannot deport 11 million people,” as he was escorted away. He was later allowed to return.

Trump has provided few details on how his proposed deportation effort would be carried out. The conservative-leaning American Action Forum concluded in a report it would cost between $400 billion to $600 billion and take 20 years to remove an estimated 11.2 million immigrants living in the country illegally.

The large-scale deportation he envisions would be impractical to enact, due to the extent to which Mexican immigrants have integrated into U.S. society, said Columbia University history professor Mae Ngai.

U.S.-born children of immigrants have been automatically considered American citizens since the adoption of the Constitution’s 14th Amendment in 1868. A Supreme Court ruling in 1898 halted previous attempts to limit the birthright of Chinese-American citizens after the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act.

The ruling upheld the clause for all U.S.-born children, Ngai said, and there have been no successful challenges to the clause since.

In the 1930s, Balderrama said, officials skirted the issue of birthright citizenship by saying they did not want to break up families.

“But they did break up families and many children never saw their parents again,” said Balderrama, co-author of a book about Mexican repatriation in the 1930s with the late historian Raymond Rodriguez, who testified before a California state committee about seeing his father for the last time at age 10, before the father left for Mexico.

That legacy lingers in songs, often played on Spanish-language radio stations, that allude to mass deportations and separation of loved ones, said Lilia Soto, an American studies professor at the University of Wyoming.

For example, the lyrics to “Ice El Hielo,” by the Los Angeles-band La Santa Cecilia, speak of a community afraid that federal agents about to arrive and launch deportations raids at any moment. The ballad “Volver, Volver,” sung by Mexican ranchera performer Vicente “Chente” Fernandez, speaks of someone vowing to return to a lover despite all obstacles.

“They’re about families being apart,” Soto said. “The lyrics are all

What You Didn’t Know about Calle 13

Calle 13 is a Puerto Rican alternative urban band consisting of stepbrothers René Pérez Joglar (lead singer, songwriter), Eduardo José Cabra Martínez (multi-instrumentalist, vocalist, beat producer) and their half-sister Ileana Cabra Joglar (backing vocals). Their stage names are Residente, Visitante and PG-13.

Calle 13 likes to blend different musical styles like reggaeton, rap and rock. While other Latino groups tend to stick to the format, Calle 13 likes to buck tradition. The group is known for using a wide range of instruments from all over the world and using provocative, tongue-in-cheek as well as socially conscientious lyrics.

Everything sounds the same on the radio…but what we are making is sincere, and I think that’s worth something.”

The band also takes on social issues facing Puerto Ricans, Latinos and people all over the world. As the frontman of the band, Residente has no problem vocalizing the group’s stance on certain topics concerning music, politics and discrimination.

The siblings are big supporters for and independent Puerto Rico, Pérez is an ally of the LGBTQ community, and the brothers go out of their way not to make music about violence, misogyny and materialism.

I want Puerto Rico to be free and independent and have just one flag. The people here don’t work the way they should, and it’s because of the comfort they are feeling from you guys, from the States. We have a very low self-esteem. We feel that we can’t do it on our own. We as a country need to feel proud about our nation.”

I want  the world to know the name Oscar López Rivera.

Fun Facts

  • The group got their name from the street they use to live on when their parents were married
  • Residente is afraid of airplanes
  • If I could have dinner with anyone, it would be with his grandmother, his great-grandmother, Roberto Clemente, and John Lennon. –Rene aka Residente
  • Visitante use to lead a ska-reggae band called Bayanga
  • Their tour band consists of 20-25 members
  • Residente would one day love to be a film director or writer
  • During sex he listens to… “No music for sex,” he said, laughing. “Naturahttps://www.latintrends.com/e-newsletter/l sounds.” -Rene aka Residente

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¡Pa gozar! Your inside scoop on Miami’s Latin music clubs

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Photo courtesy: Hoy Como Ayer

 

By, Daisy Cabrera

Ahh, glorious South Beach. Tourists flock here to bronze under the blazing sun, break waves on rented jet-skis, throw back some fruity cocktails, “watch me naenae” in mega clubs and relish under tall palm trees swaying to the ocean breeze. It’s a year-round chancleta paradise!

Miami is also an explosion of Latino culture, and the 305’s live music scene is no joke. But, here’s the thing mi gente – you’ll have to get off the Beach (yep, you read that right) and do it up local style. Dust off those dancing shoes, and get ready for some sabrosura.

In the heart of Little Havana lies an iconic, bohemian little gem called Hoy Como Ayer where you can groove to everything from salsa and Latin pop, to rock en español and flamenco. Named after Benny Moré’s hit song, Hoy Como Ayer has been entertaining folks with live music for the last 15 years. You’ll be bumping hips up in here ‘cause it’s a standing room only affair. Don’t miss the happening Thursday night ¡Fuacata! party, a Latin funk percussive soirée courtesy of Spam AllStars’ weekly residency. ¡Tremenda descarga! Famous talent who’ve graced their stage include Willy Chirino, Diego el Cigala, Albita, Pavel Nuñez, Los 3 de La Habana, Isabel Iñigo, Ana Maria Perera, Aymeé Nuviola and many more. Hoy Como Ayer is located at 2212 SW 8th St, Miami, FL 33135. http://www.hoycomoayer.us

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Photo courtesy: Ball & Chain

 

Don’t put away the guayabera just yet! A favorite haunt for many is the historic Ball & Chain (circa 1935), a gorgeous venue also located on Calle Ocho. The Friday festivities begin early with a live salsa music/lunch hour set at noon, followed by the quite popular happy hour at 4pm. At 6pm, behold the tunes of live jazz and stay for the icing on the tres leches cake – the “Miami Boheme” party – when a full band hits the outdoor Pineapple Stage at 10pm for a serious Latin music jam session. Tito Puente Jr., Nil Lara, Conjunto Progreso, Calle Sol, Tony Succar, Edwin Bonilla, Locos Por Juana, BARRIOACTIVO and countless others have performed here. Ball & Chain’s address is 1513 SW 8th St, Miami, FL 33135. http://www.ballandchainmiami.com

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Photo courtesy: La Covacha

 

On to Saturday night, where the place to be is La Covacha. Head over to Doral for this major nightclub that is all about dancing. Think big. Think jam-packed. Think major sound system. Think crazy fun! Since 1988, this has been the go-to joint to hear an array of music: rumba, merengue, cubatón, samba, vallenato – de todo, un poco. Party hard inside, or take it on back to the patio area where national musical bands move the masses ‘til the wee hours. Prominent musicians from across the globe who’ve rocked this house include Calle 13, Frankie Negron, Los Amigos Invisibles, Diva Gash, La Oreja de Van Gogh, Kinky, Hombres G, and Osmani Garcia. Visit La Covacha at 10730 NW 25th St, Doral, FL 33172. http://www.lacovacha.com

Next time you’re in the MIA, you know what spots to hit up! El que sabe, sabe.

The Many Faces of Fidel Castro

Photo by Kenya News

Photo by Kenya News

Saint, idealist, rebel, leader, dictator. Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz, or simply known as Fidel Castro, was a controversial man of many faces not just to Cubans, or Cuban-Americans, but to people around the world.

During his teens, his mentors and classmates found him to be a stubborn and deeply religious man, almost saintly. As a boy, he was sent to study at Colegio de Dolores in Santiago de Cuba with Jesuits, and when a priest fell down a stream during a hike it was Castro that pulled him to safety. Together, the two prayed fervently after surviving the ordeal.

In 1945, he joined the University of Havana‘s law school. It was there that Castro read Marxist literature, studied everything there was on Cuban politics and befriended Communist students. At this point in his life, he was simply a strong-willed, idealistic and open-minded man that wanted to fight against the oppression of the poor, but radical ideologies began to seep into his school of thought.

Castro’s father, Angel Castro, influenced him to fight for those in need. Angel, an impoverished Spaniard came to Cuba with nothing but dreams for a better life. In time, Angel Castro owned a plantation and became a landowner.

Castro became a lawyer for the poor once he obtained his degree. Since many of his clients had no money, they paid for his services with food.

It was the early 1950s when he started to struggle with the merits of democracy versus communism. Wanting to do more for those that were suffering, Castro ran for Congress only for the elections not to be upheld because of former dictator Fulgencio Batista returning to the country, taking over the government and destroying what was left of the democratic process in Cuba.

As a rebel with a cause, Castro made an appeal through the court system to take a stance against Colonel Batista’s violation of the Cuban Constitution. When that was unsuccessful, in 1953 Castro and almost 200 hundred followers attacked the military Moncada Barracks. His men were outnumbered 10 to 1 when they lost the element of surprise.

Unfortunately, this only led to Castro and what was left of his followers becoming political prisoners. This experience would go on to shape his future and that of Cuba’s for 50 years.

Believing that Castro and his men lost hope and would no longer be a threat, Batista released the surviving members of the Moncada Barracks attack after one year in 1954 so as not to come off as a dictator. This would prove to be a critical error.

Castro and his men were emboldened after their release. First, Castro retreated to Mexico, but then he came back to Cuba on an old yacht with the Argentine radical Che Guevara. With his power of speech and a group of 80, Castro initiated several guerrilla campaigns against Colonel Batista. By New Year’s Day of 1959, Batista fled Cuba.

Within a few months, Fidel Castro became the very thing he fought against, a Cuban dictator. Castro became paranoid after his coup and proceeded over the execution of 500 of Batista’s former officials.

In 1960, Cuba took over land that was owned by American and British landowners angering both superpowers in the process. This led to the Cuban embargo, in which the United States cut ties with the country. Castro turned to the Soviet Union for financial support.

As a dictator, he helped to increase sugar harvests in the country, attempted to bring about racial equality, and made social progress through medical advancements. However, the downside to his dictatorship was extreme poverty, political imprisonment and the loss of rights for citizens of Cuba, especially the middle class.

No matter what you consider Fidel Castro to be, idealist, rebel, or dictator, he was revolutionary and changed the course of history not only for Cuba but for all of Latin America, for good and bad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latino Population Rising in the South

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America is becoming more Latino these days, but no area is getting more of the Latino settlers than the good ole South.

 

According to data released last week by the Pew Hispanic Trends Project, Alabama was at the very top of the list out of a listing of 10 States with the fastest growing Hispanic Populations from 2000 to 2011.

 

Also, the gathered data showed that not one state amongst the list or research showed a significant decline of their Latino population. However, the data is not up-to-date regarding the time in-between 2011 and to the present.

 

While Alabama may be at the top having the most Latinos living in the state, the state just passed one of its strictest laws some are calling Draconian (Harsh). Aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration, the law follows in the footsteps of Arizona’s SB 1070 bill which permitted law enforcement to “question” any “suspected” illegal citizens.

 

According to the New York Times, the introduction of the law caused an exodus of Latinos residing in the state which may require a re-research on the findings.

 

Despite the immigration laws being passed that is upsetting the livelihood of Latinos, there is a booming growth in the south. The U.S. southwest remains the leading region of Latinos residing with states like New Mexico holding the highest population of 46.7% Latinos. Following after New Mexico is Texas, California, and Arizona.

 

While the data may not include 2012 and 2013, the surveys regarding the Latino population rising in the country since the result of the 2012 election showed Latinos being the powerhouse for votes is steadily coming true.

 

Policy & America’s Perception of Higher Education and Economic Mobility

Lehman President José Luis Cruz took part in an important educational panel in Washington D.C. last Thursday, discussing and debating how to translate America’s perception of higher education and economic mobility into policy.

The panel entitled “Diving into the Data: Translating America’s Perceptions Into Policy,” was organized by New America, a non-partisan think tank that recently surveyed 1,600 Americans about their opinions on the country’s higher education system. A link to the video is available here.

On the panel, Cruz conveyed his hopes and concerns facing the country’s public higher education system. He talked about Lehman’s high economic mobility rate (fourth in the nation according to a study published in The New York Times), the College’s goal to double its credentials to 90,000 by 2030, and how cuts in government funding are especially problematic for public colleges and universities.

“It is important for [policymakers] to realize that two-year and four-year public sector institutions are really the ones that are disproportionately serving students in the U.S., particularly low-income students and students of color,” said President Cruz. “For our nation to be secure and prosperous moving forward, they have to start looking at these two- and four-year institutions and providing us the resources we need.”

President Cruz’s fellow panelists were Cheryl Oldham, vice president of education policy, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Scott Ralls, president, Northern Virginia Community College; and Deborah Santiago, chief operating officer and vice president for policy, Excelencia in Education. The moderator was Rob Nabors, director of U.S. policy, advocacy, and communications, at The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The panel was part of New America’s public release of a report entitled “Varying Degrees: How America Perceives Higher Education.” The report includes a few institutional profiles of innovative and effective higher education programs, among which Lehman’s Adult Degree Program (ADP) is highlighted. A link to the ADP profile is available